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Posted on Linkedin

Klout Is Getting Interesting

This post originally appeared on Linkedin on 9/25/2014.

kloutI’ll admit I haven’t logged into Klout in quite a while. You know what? They sure have pivoted.

Once, in my opinion, the most laughable attempt at proving influence in social media, Klout has changed to make itself a content discovery/distribution platform – and it’s quite appealing. Like Buffer, it allows you to connect to your social networks and share various topics, which are interesting to you, in the process you are boosting your influence on the platform.

Having only played with the “New” Klout for a few days now, I’m going to reserve final judgement for a follow up piece, but I’m wondering what you think of it?

Have you been to Klout recently? Do you like how it pivoted? Will you use it?

Post your thoughts in the comments below.

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Seth Goldstein is an Internet marketer based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania (just north of Philadelphia). He is the creative director of two companies, Goldstein Mediaand WebMarCom. To find out more about him you can view his profile here or take a look at his blog here.

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Posted on Linkedin

Why NFC Coming To iPhone and iOS Is Good

This post originally appeared on Linkedin September 2, 2014.

Up until now NFC (Near-Field Communication) was mostly used in the mobile space by non-iOS devices and hasn’t been as widely adopted as many had hoped.

With rumors of NFC coming as a feature in the new iPhone 6, we’ll see NFC finally take hold and become a standard. In the end, NFC coming to the iPhone and iOS is good for everyone.

I’ve been an Android user for a while now and love the idea of NFC for marketing and for convenience. By just tapping your phone to a small tag one can automate a number of functions and features.

Some features that will be simpler with NFC:

  • Turning on/off GPS
  • Turning on/off WiFi
  • Tap-to-pay (With Google Wallet or any other NFC enabled mobile payment system)
  • Checking in to a location on a network like Swarm/Foursquare
  • Tap a movie poster to be taken to a movie trailer

The uses for NFC are endless.

Have you tried NFC? What do you think? Will it be useful?

Seth Goldstein in the Creative Director at Goldstein Media LLC a Philadelphia-based interactive agency. You can find out more about him by visiting his About.me page.

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Posted on SethGoldstein.net

What Makes An Influencer – Hint It’s Not In The Numbers

This post originally appeared on GoldsteinMedia.com as well as Linkedin on July 29, 2014.

I’ve been wrestling with the idea of influence on social media. For a while there, there seemed to be a formula, however flawed, for determining influence. It involved numbers:

  • Your Facebook Likes
  • Your subscriber count on Facebook
  • Your subscriber count on Youtube
  • Your Twitter Following
  • Your Kred Score
  • Your Peer Index Score
  • Your Kout Score
  • Linkedin Endorsements
  • and finally what you were writing about and your knowledge.

This, thankfully, is changing. I’ve seen many people, without huge followings or high Klout scores, become influencers in their respective spaces. Regardless of these arbitrary numbers, their content still gains traction and sometimes even goes viral. In my opinion, influence is about what you know and your willingness to share it. It’s putting yourself out there and providing value without necessarily looking for something in return — and passion for what you do. People like Chris Brogan and Gary Vaynerchuk have huge influence, they achieved it organically before all this Klout nonsense. You know why? Their knowledge, their willingness to share and their passion.

What do you think gives a person influence? Post your thoughts in the comment section below.

Seth Goldstein in the Creative Director at Goldstein Media LLC a Philadelphia-based interactive agency. You can find out more about him by visiting his About.me page.

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Posted on Linkedin

Why Millenials Can’t Be Ignored And Should Be Allowed To Shine

This post originally appeared on Linkedin on June 14, 2014

I fall into space between the Generation X crowd and the Generation Y or Millennial crowd. Born in 1981, I remember before computers were mainstream. I had a Commadore 64, a 286, a 386, a Pentium. I remember doing Web design on a 56k modem, God that was slow. I remember only having over the air channels 3, 6, 10, 12, 17, 29 and 57. But still I’m technically part of a generation, the Millennial, who many don’t remember much of what I do. Because of this I feel that it is my duty to advocate for them and show how they can’t be ignored and how they should have every chance to shine.

To many, Millennials are viewed as lazy, entitled, and scattered, etc. For some this might be true. But for many of us the adjectives of creative, entrepreneurial, out-of-the-box thinkers fit better.

Many Millennials, myself included, left college to a really depressed job market. So we did what we could to make our way.

If you live in a metropolitan area like Philadelphia, like I do, you probably see a lot of small technology and even traditional businesses sprouting up with none other than Millennials at the helm. This is their free and entrepreneurial spirit at work. They don’t wait for a job to come to them. They create the job.

The difference between Millennials and the generations before them is that they’ve grown up with technology that has changed the world. They don’t remember a time before computers. Heck, many of them don’t know before the iPad. Because of this, using these tools comes naturally and what develops is often something great.

Even with all the positives about Millennials, many employers don’t know how to best handle and use Millennials to their true potential. Many companies still lock-down social networks and have restrictive policies that many Millennials don’t like to conform to. These companies need to embrace this generation and figure out the best way to utilize their talents.

Companies need to be open to change and realize that Millennials are not pencil pushers. They are so much more. And if they are given the chance to shine, many will truly impress.

So, what do I suggest to companies? Give your young workforce a chance to shine. Bring them into higher levels of the company. You’ll find yourself pleasantly surprised.

And guess what, the next generation, Generation Z, is going to be even more wired than the Millennials. Just wait.

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Seth Goldstein is an Internet marketer based in the Philadelphia-Metro area. He can be reached at LinkedIn@gmwd.us. Seth has more than 35k people following him on Google+ and is an ambassador for Google+. You can find out more about Seth at his Google+ profile and here on LinkedIn.

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Posted on Linkedin

Top 5 Reasons To Use Your Real Name Online

This post originally appeared on Linkedin on June 12, 2014

Violet Blue posted a rant on ZDNet the other day skewering Google and Google+. Her rant focused mainly on the network’s “Real Name” policy. She was one of the many people who couldn’t use their “Real Name” on the network, because it looked like a pseudonym, she claims it’s her real name. She contends that because of this “Real Name” policy, many people in precarious positions, gender re-assignment and so on, were outed not on their terms. It’s sad that this happened, but Google made it clear that they want people to use their real names. So if you don’t want to use your real name, don’t use the network.

Violet’s column made me think about what are the top 5 reason you should use your real name online.

  1. Your friends, colleagues and family can find you and connect. This can also be a con.
  2. You can start branding yourself as an expert in your chosen field with your posts online.
  3. Using your name as your brand you can have what you post be attached to you without any confusion or questions of whether or not you’re really that “fake” name.
  4. Using your real name online gives what you say more credibility. You’re not hiding behind a veil of anonymity, therefore you’re more trusted.
  5. And finally, it keeps you honest. Using your real name makes you think about what you post online and often that is a good thing.

What do you think? Is there any you would change? Would you add any others? Post them in the comments below. Also, what did you think of Violet’s column?

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Seth Goldstein is an Internet marketer based in the Philadelphia-Metro area. He can be reached at LinkedIn@gmwd.us. Seth has more than 35k people following him on Google+ and is an ambassador for Google+. You can find out more about Seth at his Google+ profile and here on LinkedIn.

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Posted on Linkedin

A New Era Of Journalism Is Upon Us

This post originally appeared on Linkedin June 4, 2014

I’ve noticed quite a bit of tradition a journalists leaving big media companies for start-ups. This is what will ultimately save journalism. The era of large media conglomerates are done in my opinion.

Sites like The Information, The Technologizer and The Intercept are just a few great examples of this. Both have big names behind them: Jessica Lessin (WSJ),Harry McCracken (Time) and Glenn Greenwald (The Guardian), respectively.

I predict with this new age of journalism we will see viewpoints from all sides and that’s a good thing. We need media to present the news and if they have a particular view point, to articulate it and be transparent about it. Hopefully with more independent news sources, big business’ interests will not be so prevalent in this form of journalism.

What do you think? Will this new type of journalism be a good thing? Post your comments below.

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Seth Goldstein is an Internet marketer based in the Philadelphia-Metro area. He can be reached at LinkedIn@gmwd.us. Seth has more than 35k people following him on Google+ and is an ambassador for Google+. You can find out more about Seth at his Google+ profileand here on LinkedIn.

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Posted on Linkedin

Google+ and Longevity

This post was originally posted on Linkedin on May 31, 2014

Many have prognosticated the end of Google+ with the departure of Vic Gundotra. Others, like myself, have fought this negative viewpoint and feel that Google+ has a long life ahead of it.

I’m an avid Google+ user and have been on it from the beginning (beta days). I see so much value to Google+ that I can’t imagine it going away anytime soon.

To me sites like Facebook are so much more surface-level. There are some deep conversations, but not what it’s like on Google+.

Here’s some reasons why Google+ is here to stay:

  • It’s more than a network, it’s a layer, a platform, a community. All these add to the overall experience online and on Google.
  • The layer that Google+ gives to Google as a search company is priceless. It helps them gauge what’s important.
  • It is a ranking factor. Though not every part of Google+ is a ranking factor. The key parts are. If you link goes viral on Google+, you’d be silly to think that Google+ doesn’t notice this and take it into account. If you use the authority tag on your Website and blog, this gives Google a authenticity that it didn’t have before. If your business is listed on Google+ it’s also listed in Google Local. On the flip side, if your business is listed in Google Local, it’s also on Google+.
  • The community is strong. It might not be a place where you see your “In Real Life” friends, but it’s a place where you meet new people and have great conversations about all types of topics (via Communities and just on the feed). I’ve made some life-long friends that I probably wouldn’t have met otherwise on Google+.

These are just some reasons why Google+ is here to stay. I’d love to hear what you have to say about Google and Google+. Do you use it? What do you like and dislike about it? Let me know in the comments.

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Seth Goldstein is an Internet marketer based in the Philadelphia-Metro area. He can be reached at LinkedIn@gmwd.us. Seth has more than 35k people following him on Google+ and is an ambassador for Google+. You can find out more about Seth at his Google+ profileand here on LinkedIn.