I’ve been thinking a lot about online identity, especially  this month.

I have a habit of segmenting my identity across multiple platforms and domains. Part of me likes the categorization of this method, but I am realizing that it’s not necessarily the best method of connecting with my audience. Having one site where most if not all your “stuff” resides seems so much more appealing now. It’s easier to update and stay on top of the digital nuances.

Having multiple properties can stretch your bandwidth thin and make it so that instead of having one quality place for people to go, there are a bunch of places with less quality content. That’s not good.

The Need For A Hub For Everyone

Facebook would love to be the hub for all the things you do online, but that’s just “borrowed” or “rented” space. The user is the product and is at the whim of Facebook’s ever-changing “squirrel-like” interests.

So where does this leave us? I think the more spread out across the Web we get, the more we will need to have a central point to curate all of our stuff online in one place.

Spaces like About.me are trying to be that place, but I feel that a personal site is better suited for this.

Sites like WordPress.com, Wix.com, SquareSpace.com are all great starts. For the more adventurous there is the self-hosted version of WordPress, that allows for more options and freedom with the code and more robust tools to get found online.

What Should Someone Put In Their Hub?

If we’re going to have centralized hubs for our content, what do we put there?

Here are some ideas:

  • A blog
  • A resume
  • A gallery of photographs
  • Some social media profile links
  • A portfolio of work samples
  • Resource links

And that’s just the start. The possibilities are endless. Even though every platform online is vying for a piece of your digital pie, it may be time to consolidate our multiple online identities and offer our audience a one-stop place to keep up with us.


Also published on Medium.

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