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The Best Photoshop Alternatives for 2019 | Webdesigner Depot

I’m partial to Photoshop, but it’s nice to see that there are options out there for people who want something different.

I’ve used GIMP and it’s halfway decent. Also there is another one that isn’t listed called Lunacy which is a Sketch clone/competitor.

What graphics/photo editing software do you use?

For many designers, Photoshop is the number one tool for editing images, but for many other designers, Photoshop is an expensive, bloated, and inefficient tool.

Source: The Best Photoshop Alternatives for 2019 | Webdesigner Depot

By Seth

Seth Goldstein is a Digital Marketer, Technologist, Agency Owner, and Father.

He is based out of Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

4 replies on “The Best Photoshop Alternatives for 2019 | Webdesigner Depot”

I’ve mostly used GIMP, but with substantial script modifications and libraries. If I need the RAW manipulation of Photoshop, Darktable (https://www.darktable.org/) gives excellent photo workflow management and organization. For additional image editing, Krita (https://krita.org/en/) is free, lightweight, and has a portable version available to put on a thumb drive. I like apps I can plug in and use, then unplug when I’m done with it — my need for these applications is uneven, and I prefer not to fill up my hard drive with stuff I don’t use.

If I’m editing video or doing color management, there’s no better tool that I’ve ever worked with than Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve (https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/). The free version is massively powerful and broadcast-quality. Upgrading to the paid version is relatively inexpensive (much cheaper than it was a couple of years ago) and opens up workgroup collaboration and render farm options the free version doesn’t support. It’s a complex system, and taking a tutorial class for it is pretty much necessary, but there are plenty of them available online with a reasonable price. Some resources are free.

For 3d creation and rendering, there’s too many tools to mention, but one is particularly useful because it’s free. That’s Blender (https://www.blender.org/). It’s only serious flaw is the steep learning curve, but from every indication, it’s worth learning, and there are lots of resources to learn it as quickly as possible.

I’ve mostly used GIMP, but with substantial script modifications and libraries. If I need the RAW manipulation of Photoshop, Darktable (https://www.darktable.org/) gives excellent photo workflow management and organization. For additional image editing, Krita (https://krita.org/en/) is free, lightweight, and has a portable version available to put on a thumb drive. I like apps I can plug in and use, then unplug when I’m done with it — my need for these applications is uneven, and I prefer not to fill up my hard drive with stuff I don’t use.

If I’m editing video or doing color management, there’s no better tool that I’ve ever worked with than Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve (https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/). The free version is massively powerful and broadcast-quality. Upgrading to the paid version is relatively inexpensive (much cheaper than it was a couple of years ago) and opens up workgroup collaboration and render farm options the free version doesn’t support. It’s a complex system, and taking a tutorial class for it is pretty much necessary, but there are plenty of them available online with a reasonable price. Some resources are free.

For 3d creation and rendering, there’s too many tools to mention, but one is particularly useful because it’s free. That’s Blender (https://www.blender.org/). It’s only serious flaw is the steep learning curve, but from every indication, it’s worth learning, and there are lots of resources to learn it as quickly as possible.

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